♥ (111): Obtaining a work permit in Vietnam

♥ (111): Obtaining a work permit in Vietnam

Hi guys! I just recently submitted my documents for the renewal of my working permit here in HCMC Vietnam and I think it's time for me to share my experience or the things I did before processing my documents (authentication and translation). Keep in mind that the school you'll work at will tell you the required documents for the WP. So what are those documents?
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Disclaimer: This is based from my own experience of getting and renewing work permit in Vietnam. Others may have different case. I just want to remind you that I am from the Philippines.
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1. Certified copies of your degree certificates (Transcript of Records, Diploma, etc) (original)
2. English/Teaching certificates (TEFL, TOEFL, TESOL, CELTA) (original)
3. Criminal or police record from the Philippines (or your home country). Make sure it's 6 months valid. (original) In renewing your WP you don't need to submit this.
4. Employment certificate (at least 3 years working experience). This is a new regulation for foreigners in getting a work permit. It can be in Vietnam, in other countries, or in your home country. TAKE NOTE: Make sure to provide an employment certificate AND a work permit from your previous work in Vietnam if you've taught in other schools or language centers.
5. Medical check-up in VN. The school will tell you the hospitals where you can do this.
6. 3x4 pictures (this depends on the school, but my school asked for 3x4 size)
7. Passport with valid DN visa
8. Criminal record in Vietnam (It's on Pasteur St., but I forgot the street number. It takes weeks to get this! For the renewal of WP you don't need this anymore)

What do you do next?
For number 1, you need to ask your university registrar to have your documents certify and valid for use abroad (at least that's what I remember hehehe). They will send your documents to DFA for red ribbon.

For 2, 3, and 4, you have to go to the office of notary public to notarize your legal documents. Next step is DFA for red ribbon. For number 4, I wrote a Special Power of Attorney (SPA) and went to Consulate General of the Philippines here in Vietnam for the red ribbon or authentication- don't forget to bring a copy of your passport. When you receive the documents (SPA & red ribbon) you must send it back to the Philippines so your mother/father/representative can bring them to notary public together with your employment certificates.

This is the copy of my employment certificate from the Philippines.

My documents from university.

My TEFL certificate.

♥ (107): Rant, rant, and rant

♥ (107): Rant, rant, and rant

Hi guys! I think it's been over a week since the last time I posted! Waddup?! Many things have happened in the last few days. Let's have a quick run through!
a.) I had a (failed) job interview because of one question: Have you taught Math? HAHAHA NOPE! For me it's disappointing to say No, I have no experience in teaching Mathematics, but honesty is the best policy. I hate Mathematics! I can't even multiply 7 x 8 in just five seconds! I mean, Math for younger kids is very easy, but I don't think I can apply my teaching method in Literature/English when teaching Math. They are two different subjects! Also, why email me for a job interview when you are looking for Math teacher? -_- But all good, it's also a nice experience for me :)
b.) We are asked to submit our documents for work permit renewal on or before 25th. I was so worried that I won't be able to do it because I was waiting to get paid from my online work. I told Ted that I have no choice but to borrow money. 4PM yesterday I got a call from Shinhan Bank (the best bank in Vietnam IMHO) saying that I received money from overseas. I asked when it will be deposited to my account and she replied, RIGHT NOW. You have no idea how happy I was yesterday that finally I can claim my translated documents and have my medical check-up!! Not gonna lie, but I was already on the verge of losing hope! I told this to my co-teacher and he advised me to think positive and just believe and trust in God because He will never let me down.
c.) August and I went to Acoustic Bar in District 3. The place is TOO CROWDED, but I had a good time watching and listening to the bands nonetheless!

There are 4 bands every night and each band performs for 45 minutes. I had a great time, but not the best company. My Vietnamese friend ALWAYS talks and complains about her boyfriend, her Indian boss who likes her, and her job. Whenever we meet I feel like she just wants to brag or show-off something about her. Okay I think this is going to be a pretty long rant. Just bear with me for a while pls :P

♥ (106): New Zealand - Pukekura Park x Taranaki Cathedral

♥ (106): New Zealand - Pukekura Park x Taranaki Cathedral

Heya guys!! More photos from when I was in New Plymouth!
My cousin and her husband took me to Pukekura Park and I loved it there!


The first thing you will see when you enter the park is this.



It looks so calm and peaceful.




This shot looks so beautiful! 

♥ (105): New Zealand - New Plymouth

♥ (105): New Zealand - New Plymouth

I have never posted my New Zealand photos even in my previous blogs so here they are :)
These are random photos from when I visited my cousin in New Plymouth in May 2014.

P U K E A R I K I M U S E U M




 I took this photo not because of the dog, but because my real name is there - Keith.

I miss my long hair! I straightened my hair months before I traveled to New Zealand :< Now my hair is back to being dry and wavy. I might have hair treatment here in Vietnam before I leave for NZ because it's way cheaper here!


♥ (103): My Own Observation While Living in Vietnam

♥ (103): My Own Observation While Living in Vietnam

I think I have lived long enough in Vietnam for me to write this post. Or maybe not. June 22, 2016 marks my one year anniversary of living in Ho Chi Minh, Vietnam. And if you think I am already used to riding at the back of the xeom, or talking to Vietnamese people who think I am also Vietnamese, then you are.... WRONG lol

By the way, this post is only based on my own random thoughts and observation. No big deal, okay?

1. I don't know why Vietnamese people (especially security guards) leave their plates with leftover food on the street or beside the trees. I don't have pictures as proof, but I always see it whenever I walk to school. I mean, yes, the owner of the restaurant where they ordered the food will collect those plates, but WHY LEAVE THEM THERE? Why can't they bring it back on their own? That is why cockroaches and rats here are always in a good mood and don't starve heehee

2. When you go to Bui Vien or Pham Ngu Lao street and have a drink, people will offer you either alcohol or marijuana.
Photo from www.bankerinthesun.com

Bui Vien is a looooong street full of bars, night clubs, and restaurants. And you will see tons of expats there every single night. Not gonna lie during my first time on Bui Vien street I really liked it, but I heard a lot of horror stories in this place like someone putting roofie in your drink, bag or phone snatching, etc. so as much as possible I want to avoid this place. But few days ago I was here and was offered marijuana for $2 ;D


3. Grabbike is convenient, at least for me. I always make sure to write "Please speak English" on the 'notes to driver' but so far only 3 or 4 drivers got the memo :P When they call and speak English I already feel happy and safe HAHAHA not that other drivers aren't safe, but it's still different (and rare?) when drivers know how to speak English.

Few days ago I had a buffet dinner with my co-teachers and luckily the Grabbike driver I booked knows how to speak good English. We had a good talk about the new president of the Philippines, Vietnamese food, and his favorite Filipino song. I should only pay around $1, but I gave him more than that as a tip. Such a good guy!